Haig Colliery 1981 Copyright © Malcolm Street and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Haig Colliery 1981
Copyright © Malcolm Street and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Haig Colliery was sunk in 1914 by the Whitehaven Colliery Company to exploit the coal reserves between Ladysmith and Wellington Pits. The shafts are numbered 4 & 5 as the company already had 3 shafts at Wellington Pit.

Coal production commenced in 1916 and the colliery was operational intil 1986. The shafts were 1200 feet deep and the workings ran out under the Irish Sea for some 4½ miles; despite this the mine was dry.

Two steam winding engines, built by the Bever Dorling company of Bradford, were installed, the first in 1916 on the No 4 shaft which was originally used for everything, but after 1933 it was only used for manriding.

Although No 5 shaft had its engine installed by 1923, it was another 10 years before it came into use hauling coal in one ton tubs, 4 at a time. In 1983 the tub haulage was replaced by skips carrying 6 tons each time, a 50% increase.

Explosions caused by methane gas have claimed the lives of many men in the Whitehaven district. In the nearby William Pit, connected underground with Haig, explosions were frequently caused by spontaneous combustion of the gas. In all, 79 men have died at Haig Colliery. In 1922 an explosion of methane gas claimed the lives of 39 men, and a further 13 in 1928 and 27 in 1931.

In 1983, a major fault was encountered at Haig – with this, the future of the pit was in doubt. This, combined with the political situation, and the miners’ strike in 1984–85, contributed to problems at the colliery. The workforce attempted to open a new face, but a decision had been taken to close, and after two years of recovery work, Haig finally ceased mining on 31 March 1986.

Since 2014, West Cumbria Mining have been investigating the possibility of bringing back the coal mining industry to the area, which many thought had long gone.

The company have been busy undertaking a programme of coal exploration, onshore and offshore, and have proven the presence of high quality steel-making coal with very attractive properties including extremely low ash and phosphorus.

 

No 4 Shaft Winder 1981 Copyright © Malcolm Street and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

No 4 Shaft Winder 1981
Copyright © Malcolm Street and licensed for reuse
under this Creative Commons Licence

No 5 Shaft Winder 1981 Copyright © Malcolm Street and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

No 5 Shaft Winder 1981
Copyright © Malcolm Street and licensed for reuse
under this Creative Commons Licence

No 4 Shaft Top 1981 Copyright © Malcolm Street and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

No 4 Shaft Top 1981
Copyright © Malcolm Street and licensed for reuse
under this Creative Commons Licence

No 5 Shaft Top 1981 Copyright © Malcolm Street and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

No 5 Shaft Top 1981
Copyright © Malcolm Street and licensed for reuse
under this Creative Commons Licence

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